Rupert’s Land News phases out traditional paper

By The Reverend Allison Chubb

The Reverend Allison Chubb, Editor & Media Strategist for the Diocese

The Reverend Allison Chubb, Editor & Media Strategist for the Diocese

The Rupert’s Land News is about to embark on an exciting new approach to doing media in our diocese, which will take the best of yesterday’s media and re-form it in a way that meets the parishioners of today and the people of tomorrow where they are.

My name is Allison Chubb.

In addition to working with the RLN, I am the chaplain at St. John’s College and part of All Saints Church.

As the new editor and media strategist for the diocese, I am spending the summer in strategic planning and consultation to develop a consolidation of diocesan media which encompasses the Rupert’s Land News website (rupertslandnews.ca), a monthly online magazine delivered across the diocese, a weekly news email, and a social networking strategy.

In September we will launch the new media project, but over the summer you can keep an eye on our progress by following our blog at: www.progress.rupertslandnews.ca

Rupert’s Land moves toward a primarily online and social networkng approach to news.

I’m excited to be part of this opportunity, but the project cannot launch without your help. Over the coming months I’ll be looking for people interested in writing both news and opinion pieces and others who can submit photography for the new paper. In addition, the RLN Advisory Group is recruiting new members who care about our life together in Rupert’s Land and who have hopes and dreams for the future of media in this place.

The reason we feel it is important to move toward a primarily online and social networkng approach to news is that this is how most Canadians today are receiving their news.

Increasingly, not only the young but also boomers and seniors are going to the internet as the primary source for information on their neighbourhood, their country, and their church.

The days of “attractional church,” when we waited for the neighbourhood to come to us, are passing away and being replaced by missional church models which meet people where they are.

As we consider the call for stewardship of time, talent, and treasure in Rupert’s Land, it seems clear that now is the time to take the Church to where the people are.

As we consider the call for stewardship of time, talent, and treasure in Rupert’s Land, it seems clear that now is the time to take the Church to where the people are.

Our life together is like the life of a family, which grows and changes throughout the generations. Parents may be sad to see their children move away from home, but they are excited by the changes that come with mature children, newfound independence, and the arrival of grandchildren.

As Rupert’s Land undergoes just this kind of transition, we have the opportunity to embrace a future for our church which reimagines media in a way that engages the parishioners of today as well as those of tomorrow.